There is really no longer any doubt about the importance of installing a video surveillance system at a business location or monitoring a business property.

Seeing even small businesses without some sort of a security camera system that protects the property, staff, and tourists of the location is much more uncommon. Nonetheless, a common question that arises is whether to maintain the current monitoring system or invest in more sophisticated, high-tech security cameras.

Analog cameras have been the industry standard for at least the past 30 years and would be the most common choice of applications of industrial surveillance. However, more advanced security devices have become available in the last decade. As high-tech security cameras that use internet protocol (IP) over traditional analog CCTV become more popular in terms of affordability and functionality, the importance of adapting to changing times is increasing.

What Are Analog CCTV Systems?

The setup of conventional analog CCTV systems requires direct connections to the Digital Video Recorder (DVR) for security cameras. Analog cameras capture an analog video signal which is then transferred directly to the DVR via a coaxial cable. Some analog HD cameras will be powered individually while others will be powered by a Siamese cable, which combines electrical power and transmission of signal through one cable.

It is digitized and condensed after the analog video signal is sent to the DVR to be recovered and watched later. When DVRs become more sophisticated, further functionality and possibilities are accessible through a secure connection to transfer data over the network.

Advantages:

Cost: In particular, analog cameras cost less than one sensor per lens than IP cameras.

Less bandwidth: The files sent to the DVR are usually smaller as analog cameras transmit analog data over coax. Smaller files take up more bandwidth from the network. Additionally, unless the recording is watched, a DVR will not necessarily consume bandwidth.

Disadvantages:

More cables: Since all analog devices need to be separately operated as well as wired to the DVR, there will be much additional cabling and cabling to accommodate. Coaxial cables are also more common for IP devices than cabling.

Footage Quality: Even the finest analog camera can not compare with the IP camera of the lowest grade. Data, which is troublesome for identification purposes, could be grainy or unusable. Zooming into analog videos is also not possible without blurring the picture.

What Are Network IP Systems?

High-tech security cameras such as those used in Network IP networks record analog video and transfer it within the unit itself to a digital file. Motion detection and compression can even occur inside the camera. The digital files are then sent via their Ethernet connection to a secure network. The cameras are also powered via the Ethernet cable, which is then connected to a POE switch connected to the hub of the network.

A Network Video Recorder (NVR) is used for storing, compressing and preserving digital files that are much larger than their traditional equivalents. NVRs also have other advanced features to make the most of their high-tech security cameras, such as smart search and zoom.

Advantages

Video Quality: Since video images are accessed by an NVR, picture size and overall quality is significantly higher than traditional. More specifics can also be zoomed in on the video.

Fewer cables: Since there is only one link to each camera and only one cable connecting the switch to the NVR is needed, IP systems require much less cabling.

Disadvantages:

Initial Setup: It will require a whole new environment to switch to IP network systems. This usually means higher labor and installation costs when setting up high-tech security cameras initially.

Initial Cost: High-tech security cameras are likely to cost more than traditional analog variants for an IP surveillance system.